Thalaiyatti Bommai

Three friends who reside in a house do the horrendous act of kidnapping, raping and killing woman. One day, heroine Gayathri elopes from her house with her lover. One of the three friends, auto-driver Bagavathy Bala bring the couple to their house in the context of helping them. In there, the trio kill Gayathri’s lover and attack Gayathri who falls unconscious. Thinking that she too is dead, they order their gardener to bury her off in their garden.

But the gardener figures out that Gayathri is alive and feeling pity for her, he spares her life and gives shelter at his place. When the trio’s house owner returns from America, with his and gardener’s help, Gayathri makes it back to their house. The friends who see Gayathri, get convinced that she’s a ghost. Gayathri too plays the part and scares the friends but at one point, a real ghost gets into her body. Does the ghost leave the host? What happens to the three friends? Thalaiyatti Bommai answers the questions.

With a title that represents the voo-doo based ghost, director Bagavathy Bala has tried to deliver a horrifying story. But he fails to do it thanks to a number of factors. The link between two scenes doesn’t make sense. The screenplay could be called as the film’s biggest let downs and shots fail to fall in the order it’s meant to be. Cinematography, which is supposed to be a huge pillar of support for thriller and horror movies doesn’t seem to support this story in any way.

When it comes to performances, none of the characters leave a mark on us. The tried and tested formula of using making up to denote a ghost tests the patience of the audience. The director has failed to squeeze out a good performance from the lead stars and their acting looks artificial.

Overall, Thalaiyatti Bommai scares the audience in every possible way than the only way it’s meant to.